Author Topic: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To  (Read 20801 times)

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Offline KXcam22

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Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« on: February 19, 2006, 04:21:19 PM »
Fanny Pack Tool Pouch
By Cam Carr
Feb 2006

Breaking down on the trail is never fun, especially on a hot day in the dunes or countless trail miles away from your truck.  Often, having along a few well chosen tools can make the difference between a great ride, or having one of those days you would like to forget.  It is amazing what can be repaired on the trail with a few tools and some ingenuity.  Nuts can be borrowed from somewhere else on the bike, and ty-wraps or haywire can go a long way towards keeping something in place to get home.

I began carrying a fanny pack after I received a nice one as a gift (empty of course).  I ride some long single-track loops and having some tools along seemed like a good idea.  It didn?t take long to become accustomed to riding with it.  The small additional weight is barely noticeable, and is more than made up for by the additional peace of mind while you?re out on the trail.  The weight may be an issue with some, but I view it more as training aid to strengthen my legs while I ride.  Most of the time when I go riding I don?t bother to put my main tool box in the truck.  I rely on the selection of tools I bring along in my fanny pack to handle any minor maintenance.  It is ironic that, so far, I have never actually used it to fix my own bike, only riding partner?s bikes and other hapless riders I found broken down along the trail.


What (What Not) to Pack

What tools to carry in your fanny pack is the never-ending question.  Pack too much and weight can be an issue, but don?t take that one vital tool and you might end up walking home.  Your choices come down to a tradeoff between, the probability of a particular failure (i.e. a flat tire) and the weight of the tools needed to repair it.  You also must be realistic about your mechanical abilities.  If you can barely change a tire in your workshop, packing all the tools and expecting to accomplish an ISDE speed flat-repair on the trail is unrealistic.


Tools

There are lots of high quality fanny pack tools available on the aftermarket.  I take the alternate route and enjoy making many of my ?special? tools by modifying other tools.  Wrenches can be filed to larger sizes and sockets welded to wrenches.  The goal (within reason) is to carry a tool to fit most every size nut and bolt on your bike, even if you end up with a ?frankienwrench? (a wrench with a few sockets welded to one side).  For source tools, I frequent 2nd hand stores, tool sales and mostly the bottom of my too large tool box.  Cheaper is better since it is easy to lose them in the field.  As an example, the KX500 takes a 30mm wrench for the rear axle.  The one in my tool box is about 20? long and weighs enough to do arm curls with.  For a starting point, I found a thin, lightweight 1-1/8? double open end aircraft wrench, filed the jaw to 30mm and shortened the handle.  It may take a few kicks to get the axle nut loose, but it works, it?s extremely light, and it only cost me $1.

 
The following is a list of what I carry with me on a typical day-ride.  It may seem like a lot but it easily fits into my fanny pack with room for a snack, spare gloves and my digital camera.  Heck, for some rides you could probably make do with a crescent wrench and a couple of beers.


Tools That I Carry:


1.  Sparkplug wrench/spoke wrench (I use the KX one that came with my bike).
2.  Sparkplug (a cheap BR8ES in case you must give it away to a stranded rider).  I keep mine in a plastic holder to
     protect the plug.
3.  Leatherman type multitool (heavy but handy).
4.  Rear axle wrench (home made).
5.  8mm/10mm/12mm T Handle (home made).
6.  10 assorted ty-wraps (Longer is better).
7.  ? roll of Black tape.
8.  4? fuel line (for drinking, siphoning, petcock to petcock gas transfer, tourniquet etc).
9.  10? of hay wire.
10. Needle-nose vise grip pliers.
11. Mini multi-bit screwdriver.
12. Small flat screwdriver for carb tuning (I keep this in an outside pouch for easy access).
13. Assorted combination wrenches: 8mm to 14mm.
14. Allen wrench selection.
15. Mini flashlight (I use a mini-mag light but need a lighter one).
16. Disposable lighter (ever spent a cold night somewhere bad?).  Spring for a new one every season.
17. Paper towels.
18. Energy bars.
19. Compass. (Take a reading at your starting point and mark it ON the compass).
20. Cell phone (but don?t count on having coverage).
21. Masterlinks - take an assortment (Make sure it fits ? not all brands are universal).
22. Spare nuts & Bolts.
23. 5 Minute type epoxy steel (for patching case holes).
24. Location and phone number of nearest medivac helicopter (expensive but sometimes necessary).
25. 15' tow rope - 1/8" high strength kevlar climbing accessory cord.  (added Sept 7/09 after not having one when I needed it)

Note: Since I frequently ride with my family, I carry wrench sizes to fit 4 different bikes.



Extras (Might only carry on extra long rides)

1. Single use pouch of 2-stroke oil (available at most chainsaw shops).  Enables you to borrow gas and make up a
    lean mix to get home.
2. Spare tube or patch kit.  (Carry a 21? tube since it can be used universally)
3. Tire irons.
4. C02 tire inflator.
5. Signal mirror (an old CD is great for this. Nice and light too)
6. Emergency blanket. (To keep yourself or and injured rider warm)




Additional Tips:

1. Many fanny packs come with the familiar plastic quick release buckle.  I thought it was fine until it fell off and I wasted an hour searching the trail for my fanny pack.  I replaced it with a $3.00 metal positive latch buckle obtained from a safety supply store tool belt.  Always write your name and phone number on your pack as most people will return a lost pack if they can tell who it belongs to.

2. I paint most of my tools fluorescent orange to make them easier to spot on the ground after a field repair.

3. Although I am a pro tire changer, I deliberately don?t carry a tube or tire repair tools in my fanny pack (yet).  I historically never get flats and since most of my riding trails stay within 20 miles of my truck, I have chosen to risk having to ride home with a flat.  So far so good.

4. When welding tools don?t cool them with water to speed up the job.  The inherent hardening will become brittle and the tool will shatter the first time you uses it.

5. Make sure the fanny pack you purchase has a glossy coating on the fabric or cover.  They catch a lot of mud spray from the rear tire and need to easily wipe clean.


Authors Note:
The medivac helicopter might seem a bit extreme but the knowledge of where, who, and how to get it is free (yellow pages) and can be a life saver for you or your riding buddies in the right instance.  I?ve never required this dirt biking but have used the information while backcountry skiing to extract an avalanche damaged skier from the middle of nowhere.  You just never know.



« Last Edit: September 07, 2009, 04:23:07 AM by KXcam22 »

Offline KXcam22

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2006, 04:28:35 PM »
Alan,
  Can you make this a sticky. i couldn't figure it out. Thanks. Cam.

** EDIT: Done ***
« Last Edit: February 19, 2006, 04:53:17 PM by Paul »

Offline gowen

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2006, 01:02:02 AM »
Cam, excellent writeup!!! Massive props on that. I used to have a pack on my KDX years and years ago. I miss that bike alot, I get tempted every time I see one listed for-sale.

Again, thanks for the writeup.  :-D

Offline hughes

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2006, 03:00:41 AM »
Nice write up Cam. I have been riding with nothing but always with a bud. He has had to go back to the truck acouple times for tools. After reading your post my next trip I will have some of the items you listed. Thanks
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Offline Timbowe

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2006, 12:56:06 PM »
Cam are you saying that you can stuff a 21 inch tube into a 18/19 inch wheel? (universal)?
KX500
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Offline Paul

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2006, 02:00:30 PM »
Cam are you saying that you can stuff a 21 inch tube into a 18/19 inch wheel? (universal)?

Not a long term solution but it will get you back to the truck ;)

Offline alan

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2006, 03:21:27 PM »
Cam are you saying that you can stuff a 21 inch tube into a 18/19 inch wheel? (universal)?
If the back is flat just ride it! I run mine at 6 lbs when the desert is good and dry! If it is your front just ride wheelies back to the truck! No worries! He He! :lol: :lol: :lol: :roll:


Alan :-D :-D
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Offline KXcam22

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21" Tubes
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2006, 04:30:51 PM »
Tim,
  It ain't pretty but yes the 21" will go in there and have done it.   I never carry a tube and would just ride back to the truck on a flat to fix it there (where the Fosters is). If I were 50-60 miles away in a rocky area it might be different, but most of my loops stay within 10 miles or so of the truck.  My area is fast single track with lots of well anchored sharp rocks. I end up running a fairly high tire pressure (13-15psi) to preserve my rims.  I haven't had a flat for years so don't worry about it too much. Cam. :lol:
« Last Edit: February 22, 2006, 04:34:07 PM by KXcam22 »

Offline Timbowe

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2006, 05:40:29 PM »
OK good thinking. Yep I'm the same boat as you Cam as for riding on flats. Dont usally get to far away from the beers! (Suppin on Grolsch at the mo). But some times down the beach I can get up to 35 mile away from the ute. Sand is not to hard on the rim, but terrible for wheelstands Alan. :-D
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Offline demographic

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2006, 07:07:44 AM »
I know that you like making your own stuff but on tool that I have found to be very usefull is one of those Riders wrench things.

It fits the sparkplug, both axles, the fork caps and the headstock nut.

Oh and you lot know that I call a petcock a fuel tap, a wristpin a gudgeon pin, a car hood a bonnet and fenders mudguards....

Lets not go into what Fanny means over here though eh:lol:

Offline KXcam22

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2006, 02:43:53 PM »
Demo,
  That riders wrench thing (17mm/21mm/30mm) would be just the ticket. Light weight too. I haven't seen one of those. Send me a link or a pic if you have one. Cam.

Offline demographic

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2006, 09:14:18 AM »
Demo,
  That riders wrench thing (17mm/21mm/30mm) would be just the ticket. Light weight too. I haven't seen one of those. Send me a link or a pic if you have one. Cam.

Here you go..
https://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/item.aspx?style=2593&department=646&Division=6

https://sslrelay.com/s143986091.oneandoneshop.co.uk/sess/utn;jsessionid=154404c86b50b81/shopdata/?main_url=go.shopscript%3Fa%3D102

They both look about the same to me and as far as I remember mines a Freddete one like the one sold by MSR..
If you look at the small end theres two different sizes there so it does the spark plug and front axle nut, then the big end does the rear axle nut, the fork tops and the headstock bolt as far as I remember.

Thats on a 90 KX500 but I assume others have the same size nuts?
It's not particularly long so takes a bit of a boot to do the rear axle but it's no real problem.

Regards Scott.

Edit, this link is a lot more informative than the other two...
http://www.frpoffroad.com/catalog/details.aspx?ProdID=4

« Last Edit: February 28, 2006, 09:34:12 AM by demographic »

Offline KXcam22

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2006, 03:15:50 PM »
Scott,
  That's a nifty wrench. Althought I do like making things it would save a bit of weight in my fanny pack by taking the place of 2 KX wrenches. Cool. Thanks. Cam. :roll:

Offline demographic

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #13 on: August 12, 2006, 05:30:18 AM »
15. Mini flashlight (I use a mini-mag light but need a lighter one).

I have one of these at home, it's a Petzl Tikka Plus


Very handy indeed, not exactly cheap but worth it and it folfe up into a very small space.
Also the fact that it's on your head means both hands are free.




Offline KXcam22

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Re: Fanny Pack Tool Pouch - How To
« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2006, 04:58:34 AM »
That pretty cool. So far I just use a inner tube rubber band wrapped around my mini-mag lite to use as a head band. Uncomfortable as hell. Cam.